Temporary Page

Sthenoteuthis pteropus (Steenstrup, 1855)

Michael Vecchione and Richard E. Young
Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window
Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window
Containing group: Sthenoteuthis

Characteristics

  1. Arms
    1. Hectocotylus with 22-26 suckers.
    Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window
    Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window

    Sthenoteuthis pteropus. © Elsevier

  2. Tentacles


    Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window
    Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window

    Figure. Oral views of the left and right tentacle bases of S. pteropus showing the relationship between the carpal knobs (colored yellow) and the number of more proximal suckers. Note that the proximal carpal locking-sucker is absent from the tentacle on the right. Drawing modified from Pfeffer (1912).

  3. Funnel/mantle locking-apparatus
    1. Funnel and mantle components not fused.
    2. Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window
      Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window

      Figure. Frontal views of the funnel (left) and mantle (right) components of the funnel/mantle locking-apparatus of S. pteropus showing xxxxxx.

    3. Photophores

      1. Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window
        Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window

        Figure. Ventral view of the subcutaneous photophores of S. pteropus. Diagramatic illustration from Roper (1963).

Life History

S. pteropus spawns primarily in specific regions on either side of the tropical Atlantic (Zuev and Nikolsky, 1993).  in a detailed studyfrom the tropical Atlantic, found paralarval growth of S. pteropus is comparable to that of O. bartramii (ie, ca 7 mm ML at 30 days????) and proboscis separation in S. pteropus occurred at a ML of 8.5 mm and an age of 33-35 days (Arkhipkin and Mikheev, 1992). In the study by Arkhipkin and Mikheev (1992) on the age of S. pteropus, based on statolith examination, they recognized a "dark zone" in the statolith characterized by the lower transparency of the statolith and the width of the increments. They found that this period ended at about 100-110 days at a ML of about 100 mm which they considered to be the end of the juvenile period for S. pteropus.
Title Illustrations
Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window
Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window
Scientific Name Sthenoteuthis pteropus
Reference Pfeffer, G. 1912. Die Cephalopoden der Plankton-Expedition. Ergebniss der Plankton-Expedition der Humboldt-Stiftung. 2: 1-815.
View Ventral
Size 150 mm ML
About This Page


National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D. C. , USA


University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA

Page: Tree of Life Sthenoteuthis pteropus (Steenstrup, 1855). Authored by Michael Vecchione and Richard E. Young. The TEXT of this page is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License - Version 3.0. Note that images and other media featured on this page are each governed by their own license, and they may or may not be available for reuse. Click on an image or a media link to access the media data window, which provides the relevant licensing information. For the general terms and conditions of ToL material reuse and redistribution, please see the Tree of Life Copyright Policies.

Citing this page:

Vecchione, Michael and Richard E. Young. 2010. Sthenoteuthis pteropus (Steenstrup, 1855). Version 15 August 2010 (temporary). http://tolweb.org/Sthenoteuthis_pteropus/77448/2010.08.15 in The Tree of Life Web Project, http://tolweb.org/

edit this page
close box

This page is a Tree of Life Leaf Page.

Each ToL leaf page provides a synopsis of the characteristics of a group of organisms representing a leaf at the tip of the Tree of Life. The major distinction between a leaf and a branch of the Tree of Life is that a leaf cannot generally be further subdivided into subgroups representing distinct genetic lineages.

For a more detailed explanation of the different ToL page types, have a look at the Structure of the Tree of Life page.

close box

Sthenoteuthis pteropus

Page Content

articles & notes

collections

people

Explore Other Groups

random page

  go to the Tree of Life home page
top